The Art of Processing Photographs

An Art To Processing PhotosTo view more of my photography please click on www.rakmilphotography.com

Let’s dispense with the idea that great nature photography can be done entirely in-camera. With few exceptions work is needed if only to sharpen the photograph. Leaving aside techniques like HDR, compositing, and retro styling, even a photograph of something plain usually requires some touch-ups. Cropping is an obvious place where the personal touch is added. White balance also provides an opportunity to impose one’s imprint on a photograph. A third area, one frequently forgotten and perhaps the most important, is contrast. My point is that once you realize the potential, even within the limited areas mentioned above, one has the opportunity to take a good photograph and make it a great photograph. I wish everything came out of the camera perfectly and that cameras took photos in a format suitable for framing. I wish they adjusted  for white balance, colorcasts and contrast. Great photographs are made in camera and nurtured in post-processing.

9 responses

  1. A fellow that I’ve seen at B&H, Moose, recons it has to be captured correctly in camera and no post processing. I don’t agree with him at all. He doesn’t like my work — too bad.

    Liked by 1 person

    August 3, 2016 at 7:42 am

  2. I couldn’t agree more, Victor.

    Liked by 1 person

    August 3, 2016 at 11:52 am

  3. Hear, hear!

    Liked by 1 person

    August 3, 2016 at 9:29 pm

  4. I love your last statement about nurturing the photo. That’s what editing is about along with putting your creative view on the capture

    Like

    August 4, 2016 at 7:14 am

  5. Agreed! And sometimes even a lack of contrast is appealing. I do think the crop is most important.

    Liked by 1 person

    August 4, 2016 at 3:28 pm

  6. “Great photographs are made in camera and nurtured in post-processing.” Excellently put. I once met a man who refused to post-process, instead spending many long minutes setting up every shot — and, of course, sometimes missing said shot!

    Liked by 2 people

    August 4, 2016 at 11:34 pm

  7. Nice photo, and beautifully explained. You have to be very very lucky to get everything right first time., no matter how good your equipment is or how good you are a photographer.

    Like

    August 6, 2016 at 9:43 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s