Architecture

Brutalism and Contrast (Two Photographs)

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With all my writing about contrast this week, I could not leave out one other observation. When it comes to photos with significant contrast black and white or colour are not at issue either one will do. However, one area for creative post-processing is in the luminance of the different parts of the photograph. It is possible to increase the contrasting light by adding or subtracting light with graduated software filters.


Contrast Version 2.0 (Two Photographs)

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On Monday, my post was about how Black and White helps enhance contextual contrast. Today’s post shows the reverse, where colour has more impact and makes the photograph. The decision on whether to choose one treatment over another is largely a choice for the photographer. In cases like these I tend to try both options.


What Camera? (Two Photographs)

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If you have been asked what camera to buy or asked the question yourself, you are certainly not alone. It’s one of the most frequently asked questions. In my nature photography book I devoted a section to the question. While I love my Fuji XT for the street, I don’t think it can compete with Nikon D500 and 200-500 lens just yet. Mirrorless are coming along but the lenses are expensive. Many nature photographers use bridge cameras and don’t worry too much about the limitations.  In my view mirrorless are great for family, street, portraits, but DSLRs still rule most other areas like nature photography. That said the future is mirrorless. Fuji is hindered by a lack of third party lenses, but Sony, Nikon and Canon are coming along fast.


Admonition (Two Photographs)

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Bricking in the door is bit more effective than a puny sign. The idea here is you have two contrasting shots and they have a link. Makes an audience think when they are side by side. Trying new ideas to attract a viewer’s eye can’t hurt.


Allegory (Two Photographs)

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These are photos of elements of the Arthur Erickson extension to the Bank of Canada (it used to be publicly accessible but no longer). I think the photos make a great allegory for the state of the world economy and its complexity.


Window (Two Photographs)

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Reflections are an interesting area of photography, and I am fond of window reflections. But I need to remind myself that windows tend to be dirty and it would be hard to remove the dirt without killing the reflected subject, so we will just call it grunge. I sometimes have to carefully clone myself out of the photo. The processing should emphasize the detail in the window and recognize that in many cases we have two photographs (one inside the other) and they need to be handled differently.


Jig-Saw (Two Photographs)

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My e-Book Nature Photography: Making Photographs with Impact is for sale, just click on the title.

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I am a fan of reflections and this one reminded me of a jig-saw puzzle. I like the black and white conversion, the colour vision seems to remove some detail and focus for the eye despite the contrast.