Architecture

A Little Off (Two Photographs)

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These two photographs show the same subject in very different ways. The ability to emphasize detail, texture and tone in black and white in a photolike this make the mundane interesting. In colour making use of the colour palette with a bit of vibrance and saturationmakes the doorjump out while not losing the detail.  The title refers to a series of photos I am doing that have some elements that are just a bit odd, here it’s the step that seems to be an afterthought.


Profile (Two Photographs)

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These two photographs were processed slightly differently with different approaches to contrast. The second has a bit more contrast using a push processing preset. Thepoint here is in walking about a city, buildings sometimes provide an opportunity for a unique perspective, part of the fun is finding that perspective.


Bringing Yourself to the Party (Three Photographs)

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One of things I mentioned in an earlier post is thinking about what you as a photographer bring to a photograph. On my walks I photograph odd things, not because they are odd, but because I have an idea of how I want to shoot and process the results. In the photo of the peacock mural, being forced to take the photo at an angle made me appreciate the depth and structure of the surface it was painted on. In processing I de-saturated slightly the photo and emphasized the detail in the brick work (to highlight the painting) and used a cinematic crop, that and the angle is my contribution to what is an incredible sight on the corner of a busy street. In the second photo my thinking was to do it both in black and white and colour, I could then emphasize the different textures and the atmosphere with attention to tones and light.I don’t think it’s lost on the viewer that it’s part of a doorway (had I left in the door itself, there would be reflections of cars etc). In short doing this kind of photography can involve much more work than is apparent to the viewer, but in the end the results are in the eyes of the viewer.


Some Reflections and Further Comments on Aperture (Two Photographs)

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Shot with a Fuji XT-2, and a 23mm lens (aspect ratio equivalent to a 35mm lens) at F8. You will notice that pretty much everything is in focus. In landscapes and photographs of events, crowds, and large objects it is not always feasible to use a small F Stop like F 16 and get sharp pictures and everything in focus. A depth of field calculator could provide, for any given  F Stop a definitive distance to focus on ( say ten feet out) called the hyper-focal distance that would make sure everything is in focus. Or if fiddling with your smartphone is too much, use this rule of thumb, focus one-third into the scene this should get most everything in focus, not as much as the calculated hyper-focal distance but good enough. When we use larger apertures (smaller F Stop ) we get the exact opposite effect; selective focus (where your focus is on something close and everything behind is more or less out of focus). A large aperture also allows more light to reach the sensor therefore avoiding having to use a higher ISO and generate noise.


The Doorway (Two Photographs)

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I found this down an alley and could not resist the opportunity to capture this piece of art. It deserves to stand alone and not be in a series. It’s amazing the trouble someone must have gone to to create this wonder that very few will ever see. I have not done much to this except correct the exposure. And it looks just as good in black and white!


A Marvellous Fence (Three Photographs)

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The widest of focal lengths would not have done me much good here, the gate to the park was facing a major and busy street. There was no let up in traffic, and while I stood between some parked cars it was not perfect. Still it’s a marvelous piece of work in steel by Tim desClouds. I did these in black and white because of the contrast.


Extravagant (Two Photographs)

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I am on the record for saying artists should select the level of latitude with which they are comfortable. In terms of post-processing if you want psychedelic colours that’s your prerogative. What is important is the intent. I think intent has a lot to do with personal style. In the first photo I wanted the foreground not be lost in what was a fairly complex shot, so my formatting and masks worked to make sure that area was highlighted or at least did not disappear. In the second the graffiti/art work was lost in all of the other things surrounding it, and processing in Luminar, Aurora HDR, and Tonality was driven by a desire to tone down the city elements surrounding the artwork.