Art

Murals (Two Photographs)

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I was recently in Montreal, walking about taking photographs I came across this development and saw these murals. They are definitely out-of-the-way and off the main streets. Besides showing pride in community, at least one of the murals may show what the neighborhood looked like before modern developers arrived. I have tried in both photos to place the murals in context and not just show the murals alone.


Thinking (Three Photographs)

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While I don’t hesitate to take shots of things that interest me, I do like to think through where the shot might go both in camera and in processing. I was once told that the definition of a professional photographer is that they know exactly what the outcome will be. In that regard I think imagination is one thing and reality is another. And while I think through what I do I am not beholden to a fixed outcome. Professionals have clients they have to please, the rest of us have our own ideals to live up to. These photos took some time in camera (number of shots to get what I wanted) and then more time in processing to flesh out my thinking.


The Jellyfish In the Queen’s Lantern (Three Photographs)

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They replaced the Tower of the Victoria Building with the “Queen’s Lantern” and in the Lantern they have hung inflated animals tied to various exhibits. This is a jellyfish, the exhibit was on bio-luminescence. It’s still there. Regardless of how you look at this installation, it has a certain spooky nature, hence my deciding the photos looked better in B&W. In color they looked like something out of a science fiction movie.


The Iceberg (Three Photographs)

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This is the Iceberg by William (Bill) Lishman that sits outside the Canadian Museum of Nature. It seems these days that the sight lines to many public installations are marred by signs and such. In this case less so than for many others, but the sculpture is so large that as you can see in the last photograph, the photo must include more than just the museum as background. Even the publicity for the sculpture did not have photos of the entire sculpture. Here I have taken some details of the sculpture and a photo of the whole scene to show its immensity.


L’Odyssée

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L’Odyssée is the name of this work. I find it amusing. It’s in a park off a main street, facing a hotel that is linked to several government buildings. The photography was straight forward B&W. The artist duo Cooke-Sasseville describe this work below. I have had a chance to look at more of their work on-line and I like the whimsy. This work also makes for some great photography opportunities.

“A park is taken over by three oversized pigeons eyeing a Campbell’s soup can… These birds give the impression of not understanding how to open the can or not knowing that it contains a large amount of food. A reference to pop art and Andy Warhol, The Odyssey becomes the representation of the perceived impenetrable world for which contemporary art is often criticized.”


To the Left (Two Photographs)

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These were taken within a few feet of one another in a small town. Thematically, juxtapositions and commonalities can have impact. These two photos have one thing in common that links them regardless of subject. I have seen some great exhibits based on this premise. I suspect if these were in one room and on opposite walls, people would unconsciously connect them.


Yellow (Three Photographs)

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Understanding the color wheel, what colors are opposites and how colors work together helps with any kind of photography; even black and white where color filters remove that tonality from the photo. Camera styles and different films all interpret color differently. In addition computers and photographic quality paper are limited to the range of color they can portray. If your client is Coke and they want a specific copyrighted color for their ads this can be tricky. For the rest of us color is an element that has some flexibility and room for interpretation. Changing white balance or working with and using hue, saturation and luminance can be a good start to add a small personal touch. In these I have left the color as it was but boosted the contrast and lowered the highlights. That technique intensifies the color slightly.