Posts tagged “Architecture

Window Reflections (Three Photographs)

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In my meanderings about town this summer and fall I have found a few unique window reflections that struck me as fine modern art. Oddities, including reflections are favourite subjects of mine. Until the snow gets too deep, I’ll keep walking. 


To the Left (Two Photographs)

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These were taken within a few feet of one another in a small town. Thematically, juxtapositions and commonalities can have impact. These two photos have one thing in common that links them regardless of subject. I have seen some great exhibits based on this premise. I suspect if these were in one room and on opposite walls, people would unconsciously connect them.


The Good the Bad and the Ugly (Three Photographs)

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On a road trip out-of-town we ran across these old buildings that reminded me of an old movie set. I wanted that old western style of photo. Gives a bit of character to the abandoned. The buildings are on a hill you pass just as you enter the town of Renfrew, Ontario. Given the location one would think something could be made of this location and buildings. They do have some character.

 


Light, Dappled and Shadowed, Shaken not Stirred (Three Photographs)

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Photography is all about light: quality, direction, etc. Every book on photography goes into this in detail, then moves on to time of day, studio lights etc. I think dappled light is underrated for the most part because it causes chromatic aberrtion in many colour situations and complicates exposure (because of the limited dynamic range of light cameras can see). Similarly, strong shadows can be interesting to work with. All good ideas worth exploring.

 


More on Making a Photograph (Two Photographs)

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This is a shot of a back alley mural, and my angle of view has put it into context, I am as interested in the mural as the sky and the buildings that frame it. It has been said more than once that one of the reasons Black and White is popular among photographers is that it takes more effort in post-processing to make the photos work. The character and detail that comes out in a monotone image as compared to color has a special impact. To repeat myself from other posts, I take all of my street photographs in black and white with my Fuji camera,when they are imported into my Adobe editing software it converts them to color. There are some things I prefer to do in the color version: reduce noise, sharpen, crop, get the exposure to a starting point before I convert it to B&W and make monochromatic adjustments, e.g. see if a color filter will enhance the detail. So yes there is more work in B&W, but the results are pleasing.


Making a Photo (Three Photographs)

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In an earlier post this week I wrote about why buildings fall backwards and distort when taking photographs of them unless you use a tilt-shift lenses or position yourself in an ideal if difficult position (that is dead center of the building which maybe many stories up). I also used the phrase “making a photograph”. Here I have totally ignored a few basics, the building is by no means straight and the colors are to some degree exaggerated (though the second photo except for sharpening is out of the camera, flare and all). The building has a Gotham-like design that I tried to accentuate. The making of a photograph means having an idea about the outcome when taking the photograph, implementing what we can in camera, and finishing it off in the editing phase. In this case the same venue afforded me several possible approaches, three of which are here.


Why Buildings Bend and Lean (Two Photographs)

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In these photographs I have tried my best to keep lines straight and the buildings from leaning back. The science of optics dictates that if you are not shooting straight on at the middle of a building it will lean backwards. Tilt shift lenses fix this to a great degree but at a considerable cost, it’s cheaper to use the transform and lens correction tools in software like Lightroom to straighten and correct these issues (works for most but not all situations). These Fuji XT-2 photos were a lot of work to straighten to the degree I could. These issues are common and while photographers try their best to fix them they are a part of the making of a photograph and a challenge in architectural and interior photography.