Posts tagged “Flora

A Quirk of Aperture (Three Photographs)

To view more of my photography please click on www.rakmilphotography.com

Shooting with a cropped sensor (e.g. one that is one half the size of a full frame camera) has a few implications, one of which is that you need to think about apertures multiplied by the crop factor. This means that small sensors have greater depth of field at the stated aperture than a full frame camera would at the same aperture. Now if you look at the second and the third photograph, they were taken at F5.6 and F5.0 and the difference should be quite noticeable as it’s a full stop difference in full-frame terms. I hear someone say “why compare it to full frame if I am not using a full frame camera?” Because for close-up and macro photography you have the kind of flexibility that full frame cameras do not offer (and it’s a myth that you lose out on great out of focus backgrounds).


Eight By Ten (Two Photographs)

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There are standard dimensions for photos (e.g. 8 by 10) and then there are standard dimensions for frames (e.g. 8.5 by 11), for publications it depends. Then there is shooting in portrait mode – camera vertical – (which magazines and books sometimes prefer) or landscape mode – camera horizontal – (which in a publication may mean a two page spread). Some professionals shoot in Raw and JPEG and both portrait and landscape. Now the amateur is less likely to care about these nuances, unless they want to frame their photo. More importantly these decisions on dimensions and quality have an impact on the photograph, in first case because of the overall perception of the photo and in the second, the degree to which the photo can be edited. When it comes to RAW or JPEG I shoot RAW and I shoot in the mode that captures the subject as I see it. Dimensions concern me because they are important for this blog and for my online shop (see link above).


Disturbances (Three Photographs)

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I like it when things pop-out in my photos. When shooting tulips and other flowers I have had to worry about cats and other things popping out of the foliage. The last photo is another kind of disturbance altogether, more little shop of horrors than tulip festival.


Tulips (Three Photographs)

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How to stand out in a crowd… In my last tulip post I spoke of some techniques to focus the viewer on the subject. Another technique I did not mention was depth of field; logically, what is in focus is what matters. The challenge in a field of flowers where you cannot move things around and stage-manage is that when using a very narrow depth of field to isolate your subject some of what you don’t want will still be in focus.

 


Tulips (Three Photographs)

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These are more tulips from the Ottawa Tulip Festival. This time I was focusing on framing and negative space. The idea is to make sure your viewers’ eyes go where you want them to go. Tools include, vignette, increasing shadows generally, framing in camera and tightened cropping after the fact without necessarily placing the subject in the middle of the frame.


One Flower, Three Flavors (Three Photographs)

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I visited the Ottawa Tulip Festival on its opening day, as it was mid day there were not many people about, so I did not have the opportunity for the candid shots I wanted to take. I did come away with some flower shots I could play with. The black and white version is a bit funereal but it was worth the effort and might be useful someday as an illustration. As for the color versions simplicity was my goal.


Just to Cheer Me Up (Two Photographs)

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Most of Canada is not the frozen north, but I edited these in late March when it was cold, damp and miserable outside. It is now May and the weather only recently improved. I hope things dry up and I can get to the next Tulip festival without the need for a heavy coat or umbrella! Maybe this year I will focus more on the people than the flowers, that would make a bit of a change.