Posts tagged “Landscape

An Eighty-Four Degree Angle of View (Two Photographs)

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If you have a full frame camera, a 24mm lens has the angle of view of 84 degrees and with a 1.5 cropped sensor (like the Fuji XT-2), 16mm gives you the same angle of view. This is because the sensor on the XT-2 is half the size of a full frame camera. I make this point only because what matters is the angle of view and not the length of the lens when it comes to wide-angle lenses. For many years, 24mm was the standard wide-angle lens with the 20mm or 90 degrees angle of view considered a specialty lens and much more expensive. I took these photos with the Fuji 16mm lens. As I mentioned in a post earlier this week, the idea that you can get more subject and background into the picture close up is one benefit. Another is that you can use the periphery of the photo to capture a subject and be unobtrusive. The man walking never noticed the photo being taken, I was facing down the street. You can take landscape with any lens, including telephoto lenses; with a wide-angle of view, details in landscapes become smaller the further away you are.


Shooting for the Crop (Two Photographs)

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Shooting for the crop is one of those photographic phrases that has more than one meaning, and has changed over time. It can mean shooting in a format appropriate for its final use, for example 8.5 by 11 for magazines, 8 by 10 for framing. It can mean shooting knowing that in processing a bit of room around the edges will help. The latter is very useful and I would suggest always trying for a bit more room around your subject. Shooting for the crop can also mean choosing to shoot in landscape or portrait, another “in-camera” option that is useful. Some photographers shoot every photo in both, just as they set their camera to record both Raw and Jpg files. Perhaps most importantly, shooting for the crop is thinking about what should and should not be in your photo and what you want the end result to be.


Texture (Two Photographs)

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In photo composites one of the elements often used is texture. Texture overlays are popular in photography. You add a layer of some texture: clouds, fabric, sand, and then fade it into the picture to give added texture. Another method is to work with detail extraction, tonality and HDR toning to get existing textures in the photograph to stand out. Almost every add-in program has some form of structure, detail, and tonal contrast tool to affect these changes. It can lead to a grungy look, or give a photo a more realistic look. With the photo of the hydrant I used detail and tonal extraction and with the Canadian flag photo I added in some HDR toning. I finalized the images in B&W, because detail and texture are more evident in B&W. It’s a technique I have used often when I felt the texture of a scene was important or essential to its character.


A Landscape Surprise (Three Photos)

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I am not a big believer in out of the camera shots. In this case, however, except for some cropping and a touch of shadow enhancement, these are out of the camera taken with a Fuji XT-2 camera and 35mm F2 lens. I have read that many people just use the JPGs straight out of the camera with the Fuji and now I understand why. I shot these in RAW format because I’m used to processing and will probably continue to do so some. The “Acros Film” simulation is impressive. I am still fiddling with settings on the camera, especially now that there is a new firmware update. Fuji could do some work on their manual and menus but that’s a complaint you hear about many cameras.

 

 


Tilt and Reflect (Three Photographs)

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There is a type of composition, much used in film noir, and sometimes used in photography called the Dutch tilt. Normally I like my horizons and buildings up-right. And to be frank the Dutch tilt is not usually my style. I do like reflections and sometimes getting those reflections involves a slight tilt or distortion. I like to think the two give a bit of mood to a picture.


Just to Cheer Me Up (Two Photographs)

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Most of Canada is not the frozen north, but I edited these in late March when it was cold, damp and miserable outside. It is now May and the weather only recently improved. I hope things dry up and I can get to the next Tulip festival without the need for a heavy coat or umbrella! Maybe this year I will focus more on the people than the flowers, that would make a bit of a change.


Winter (Three Photographs)

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Some Canadians have great love for the snow and ice. Paintings and photography of winter wildness has been popular for years. Not being a great fan of winter has kept me out of the forest this year. These photos taken in January are among the few I took. When fresh snow covers everything it simplifies the landscape. I wasn’t sure about using color or B&W and opted for B&W, but left one color in the mix to show my starting point.