Insects

Hummingbird Moth

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A friend told us about these moths and took my wife and I on a fairly long drive so we could see one, that was some years ago and ever since we have been interested in seeing more of them. This one decided to land on a bush directly in front of me. I crept up on it and got a few shots before it flew off into the long grass. The same size as a hummingbird and almost as fast and acrobatic, an interesting find on any day.


A Red Admiral Butterfly (Two Photographs)

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Walking in nature reserves, the thing I notice most is movement and out of place color. Often the movement means that whatever it was is getting away from me. Sometimes it gives me a hint as to where to look to find a subject. This butterfly and I startled each other, I backed off and it flew into a tree. These are the photographs I took when it landed. In cases like this a long hand-held lens helps. Long because of the distance and handheld because a tripod would have been awkward to adjust for the height.


An Inquisitive Bee

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I am finding bees increasingly interesting and they make great subjects for photography. I am grateful for my 105mm lens and 24mm extension tube that get me optically close to, but not too physically close to the bees. I was watching this bee and taking several shots as it walked along the stamen, quite the delicate walk at a furious pace. I was using a flash and I am used to the flash frightening off a few insects, but never bees. So I was taken aback when the bee stopped and looked directly at me.


Mood Part 1 (Two Photographs)

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In photography you hear a lot about mood. It’s not just the editing but also the subject and the context in which it is taken. I thought I would try a few things. This mayfly landed on our car and I could not resist the shot. The color version accentuates the depth of field which is marked by the dust; in the black and white the car forms a stage for the subject and the lighting acts like stage lighting.


A Bee and Some Comments on Close-up Photography (Two Photographs)

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I took these less than a minute apart. The light changed and while I am pleased with the photos, I did not use artificial light. With artificial light I could have lowered the ISO and improved the quality of the photo with a touch more detail and greater sharpness. A higher ISO would have added too much visible noise. The photo was cropped significantly as are most close-up photos of insects. My conclusion is that insect photography, even in bright sunlight benefits from artificial light (and extension tubes). Technical details: 1/400th of a second and f7.1, ISO 640 on a cropped sensor Nikon D7200 with a full frame 105mm lens and no extension tubes.


Hail and Hello (Three Photographs)

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Like most people I am not a fan of wasps or hornets, like the yellow jacket here. But they can be interesting, and this one in between going up and down the grass chose to wave at me! As an aside this was part of an experiment where I dispensed with flash for macro shots. While cumbersome, flash is definitely useful, especially for stopping motion.


Hover Fly (two Photographs)

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Of all the flies I have photographed the most impressive is the hover fly, for its aerial acrobatics, its fearlessness in the face of larger insects and its resemblance to Droopy the Dog (a Tex Avery cartoon character). When you approach most flies they fly off. The hover flies I have dealt with move but they often stay in the same area. Some flies just ignore you, but the hover fly is a show off.