Posts tagged “www.rakmilphotography.com

Bee Fight (Two Photographs)

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I was very surprised to learn that bees fight. This bout took about 4 seconds, and in the last round the bee on the right chose to fly off, leaving leftie to carry on pillaging the flowers. Nature Photographers are always on the look out for the unusual. This time it just happened while I was trying to shoot a metallic bee.


Hairy Woodpecker and Choices (Two Photographs)

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If you follow me you will know I pay close attention to eyes, posture and impact in my nature photographs. I usually take many photographs of the same subject both to overcome errors, and to have a choice of shots (not too many and no motor driven machine gunning shoot, just a few). In this case seven. These two shots were the best.

 


Hairstreak Butterfly (Two Photographs)

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I have posted photos of the Hairstreak before, so this time I wanted to try a black and white treatment. Black and white brings out elements that colour hides and also brings out a bit of drama (almost always a good thing in photography).

 


Hummingbird (Two Photographs)

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Assuming a good shutter speed and focus, there is a good chance of a great hummingbird shot every time you see one in the frame. Therein lies the catch. Finding a small object with a telephoto lens is always a challenge. After practicing you can get it right more often than not, but it’s a learned skill.


Chiaroscuro in Colour (Two Photographs)

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I showed these same photos in black and a white a week ago. They also work in colour, but in this case the shadows, for example, do not have the same impact as they do in black and white. In my view colour or black and white is often a choice, and both might be just as pleasing.


The Tilt (Two Photographs)

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What differentiates these shots is a slight tilt but that subtle tilt pushes your eye down the path. It’s an old trick that works most of the time in landscapes. If you put a person in the frame it will more than likely not work.

 

 


Posture or Eyes?

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I always choose a subject’s eyes over posture if I can. This chickadee’s eyes were almost invisible and efforts with Photoshop to improve them were virtually imperceptible. When this happens your image depends on the posture of the bird, or some other story.


Hummingbird Moth (Two Photographs)

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If you see one of these wonderful creatures, time is not on your side. You need a super fast shutter speed and great reflexes just to get a few good shots. The moths are almost always in flight and hovering means a bit of jitter. Nonetheless they are quite a catch as they are not common where I live.


Your Position Matters (Two Photographs)

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Your position matters and not just in politics. The difference in these two photographs is where I was standing. In the first and better shot, the reflection of the tree adds to the composition rather than becoming a distraction.


Chiaroscuro (Two Photographs)

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Chiaroscuro is a term for the use of strong contrasts between light and dark, modeling with light in painting and drawing. I have yet to see a definition that applies chiaroscuro directly to photography. But it does often apply.


Daffy Duck (Three Photographs)

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Every so often you come across a natural actor. As a photographer I am always looking for the unusual, or a story. But definitely something unexpected. At first I thought the duck was in difficulty but my next shots disproved that.


Sober Second Thought (Two Photographs)

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I posted these in Black and White, under the title “pandemical”. It struck me that the colour versions tell another story worth telling – that there is often a brighter side of things. I think it’s worth thinking about when we consider what photographs to display.


A Bee on Echinacea (Two Photographs)

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The echinacea flower is a favourite of bees and makes for a classic bee shot. The trick is to take many photographs while moving closer and filling the frame. My preference is to have the bee less centred on the flower, but I get what I get.


Not As Shy As She Looks

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This duck was preening close to shore. It was that time of year when ducks know people will throw food to them. So even though she had things to do she was not going miss lunch. While I don’t like the idea of feeding ducks, I am an opportunistic photographer.


A Hornet (Two Photographs)

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Hornets are not my favourite subjects and fortunately I don’t see many. This one took me by surprise. I saw an insect but it was not until I got close up that I realized what it was. Thankfully it was otherwise occupied and ignored me.


The Look (Two Photographs)

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In previous posts I showed how light can make a big difference in animal photography as it does with people. I talked about catching interesting expressions and eyes. This time I wanted to make the point that these are not unique approaches or opportunities, but in my view the best ways to approach composition.


Victorian Wallpaper (Two Photographs)

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I took these shots not really thinking about the outcome. My interest was in testing my camera after not having used it for awhile. But I love this pseudo Victorian wallpaper look. I did it in colour and black and white because the shot works both ways.


Duck Shot ( Two Photographs)

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I am fond of headshots of people and animals. With animals I will often try a few shots. With little control over light and subject it’s the photographic equivalent of Russian roulette. Very few have the impact I like. In my view, these shots worked.


A Slight Obstruction (Two Photographs)

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Insects often try to hide behind things, as do rabbits etc. I was once asked what I do about that. I explained that sometimes it doesn’t matter, sometimes it tells a story and sometimes it’s annoying. Two out of three are not bad odds for a good shot.


Perspective (Two Photographs)

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When shooting butterflies my rules include being able to see the eyes, and capturing as much detail of the wings and body as I can. I rarely go for the top down shot and these photographs are the exceptions. But they do make it easier to identify the beast.


Pandemical (Two Photographs)

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It’s hard to be positive under the pressure of the pandemic. Gloves, masks and social distancing does not help my photography. The nature paths are too narrow and there have been too many nuts just breaking all the rules. They don’t see the harm they can do by ignoring health authorities. These bleak images reflect my feelings on the worst of days under Covid-19.


Welcome (Two Photographs)

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I like to think that when ducks do this they are being welcoming or at least playing. But in reality they are just making sure the water runs off their backs. Still it can be spectacular show if the duck does the full dance.


A Canadian Tiger Swallowtail

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When I took these photographs I had never seen these butterflies before. The camera overexposed the photos, but not so much that I could not fix it later. Like most butterflies the visit was short but sweet.


Getting Closer (Two Photographs)

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Getting closer is not always about long and expensive lenses. It can also be the result of up-sizing, grouping and formatting in post production. The latest in photography software is all about upsizing photographs and it may affect the way we think about the size of our camera’s sensors.