Posts tagged “Macro

Grasshoppers (Two Photographs)

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Another example (see my Friday post on dragonflies) with two subjects. As subjects, grasshoppers generally can be expected to do something entertaining when they try to hide. This was the first time I saw two grasshoppers together, so I gave it my best shot. Nearly there.  Macro lenses doing close up work have shallow depths of field and my best guess was not perfect. Still, the photographs, at least in my collection are unique.


Mating Damselflies (Three Photographs)

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This was a challenging shoot. I took about sixty shots with two separate cameras. I wanted both dragonflies in focus, and they were flapping their wings and moving about. The first of these shots was taken with macro kit, 105mm lens and flash in a soft box at F18. The latter two were taken with a 200-500mm lens at 500mm at F11. With two subjects I needed the greater depth of field. On the first shot I should have lowered the power of the flash, but I was worried it would take too long and the dragonflies would fly off, so I switched to my other camera with the longer lens. The first shot was taken at F18 and this resulted in some noise. I had noise at ISO 400, at F11, on the 500mm I was shooting at ISO 3200 (otherwise known as “if all else fails”). The successful noise reduction was done with Macphun’s Noiseless. CK

 


Cabbage White Butterflies (Two Photographs)

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The more I read about macro and close up photography the more I read about butterflies. Butterflies get active at around 15 degrees celsius I’m told, so many people find it easy to shoot butterflies in the early morning or evening. During the day when they find nectar or a source for salt (usually on the ground), they are easy to find  and shoot. I would also suggest using a telephoto lens, as it rare for a butterfly to land close enough for it to be within reach of a macro lens. This was taken at 500mm, but great shots can be had at 200mm. You do end up cropping, and my sensor is 24 megapixels, the last shot is cropped about to half of that. This a particularly small butterfly and it is certainly easier with larger butterflies.


Eastern Tailed Blue Butterfly (Two Photographs)

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With butterflies, particularly small ones, getting the eyes and the wings in full view is a challenge. In these two photos there are a couple of things to note. Good light meant closed wings, while open wings meant shadows. Still I got the eyes in both. Taken with a long lens a flash would not have helped the lighting. Butterflies are wonderful subjects and like all great subjects there are challenges that make the taking of the photograph more interesting.


Blue Mud Dauber Wasp (Two Photographs)

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This wasp is your friend if you don’t like black widow spiders among other nasty insects and bugs. Not overly aggressive they save their strength for their prey. Not the firs time I have shot these but the first where the blue was so easily seen (see second photo). Normally the light makes them more black than blue.


Grasshopper (Two Photographs)

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In general grasshoppers will jump away from you and then try to “hide”. There is seldom a third jump unless you startle them again. I put hide in quotes because they are often still in plain sight like this one lying in his leafy hammock. Grasshoppers do not permit much opportunity for changing perspective once you have found them, as long as you remain still it will as well. I use a softened flash, and that has never bothered a grasshopper, what it does is create hot spots on all the dust on the grasshopper and the dust takes on the colors of the rainbow. I fix some but not all of that when I edit. Contrast and good color management ensure that color casts are not an issue. In my view what makes a good grasshopper shoot is the stare when you get them even partially face on.


Here be Dragons (Two Photographs)

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You seldom catch a beetle in flight or taking off so I was very pleased with the first shot. Looking at the two shots I noticed a slight resemblance to some of the illustrations I have seen of dragons and other mythical beings. They are remarkable looking creatures, regardless of the comparison.