Posts tagged “Fujifilm

Inventive Risk (Three Photographs)

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These photographs have nothing in common except my desire to take some liberties in processing. In the first, the forced perspective (unusual juxtaposition) of the live subjects and the memorial to 1815 just caught my fancy and the B&W added some drama. The second photo in color reminded me of old-time double exposures with date expired film. In facts it’s a reflection in a window. The B&W reminds me of the old high contrast Tri-X film. Sometimes it’s worth going beyond the boundaries and taking an inventive risk for the hell of it.


The Man with Two Hats (Two Photographs)

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This statue commemorates the liberation of Holland by Canadian troops in WWII. It stands on the edge of the park where the majority of the Annual Tulip Festival is held. Another copy of the statue is in Apeldorn in Holland. I am sure the statue is meant to symbolize the lasting friendship between Canada and the Netherlands but the plaque says nothing about the symbolism. However on a day becoming increasingly gloomy it reminded me of this quote by Lord Grey, UK Foreign Minister on the eve of WWI “The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime.”


Photographer’s Block (Three Photographs)

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I understand writer’s block, photographers block not so much. Cold wet days, with flooding and other challenges is neither the fault of the camera or photographer. I took these in the few nice days we had in early spring. There isn’t always something to photograph but you don’t really know until you look and focus your attention. As a result, photographers sometimes do not make the best companions when they are intent on their work.


An Eighty-Four Degree Angle of View (Two Photographs)

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If you have a full frame camera, a 24mm lens has the angle of view of 84 degrees and with a 1.5 cropped sensor (like the Fuji XT-2), 16mm gives you the same angle of view. This is because the sensor on the XT-2 is half the size of a full frame camera. I make this point only because what matters is the angle of view and not the length of the lens when it comes to wide-angle lenses. For many years, 24mm was the standard wide-angle lens with the 20mm or 90 degrees angle of view considered a specialty lens and much more expensive. I took these photos with the Fuji 16mm lens. As I mentioned in a post earlier this week, the idea that you can get more subject and background into the picture close up is one benefit. Another is that you can use the periphery of the photo to capture a subject and be unobtrusive. The man walking never noticed the photo being taken, I was facing down the street. You can take landscape with any lens, including telephoto lenses; with a wide-angle of view, details in landscapes become smaller the further away you are.


Two Murals (Two Photographs)

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When it comes to prime lenses, the angle of view of a 24mm lens makes it one of my favorites. It gives a lot of room for maneuver. In an urban environment you capture great things in a tight space. Landscape photography is another great use of the lens. These were taken on a cold overcast day when I just wanted to test my new 16mm Fuji lens (which has the same angle of view as a full frame 24mm lens). There is nothing to dislike about this lens. Many kit lens are 18mm at their widest and it’s the least used element of the lens. Besides allowing you to shoot quite close, it’s a great exercise to force yourself to use an unusual focal length. Wide-angle lenses are a great tool to make sure your photos have context and framing.


Dynamic (Two Photographs)

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The statue is called Joy and it sits on a street that was long ago turned into a mall. The construction and for rent signs are only two of the obstacles to shoot around, during the weekday this downtown venue is packed, evenings and weekends not so much. It’s a space that it is hard to get clear shots. The statue is almost lost in those distractions so I chose a perspective that gave it some dynamism. The color version underline the issues I was trying to avoid and the black and white just works, but that’s my view.


Texture (Two Photographs)

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In photo composites one of the elements often used is texture. Texture overlays are popular in photography. You add a layer of some texture: clouds, fabric, sand, and then fade it into the picture to give added texture. Another method is to work with detail extraction, tonality and HDR toning to get existing textures in the photograph to stand out. Almost every add-in program has some form of structure, detail, and tonal contrast tool to affect these changes. It can lead to a grungy look, or give a photo a more realistic look. With the photo of the hydrant I used detail and tonal extraction and with the Canadian flag photo I added in some HDR toning. I finalized the images in B&W, because detail and texture are more evident in B&W. It’s a technique I have used often when I felt the texture of a scene was important or essential to its character.